Reading Ramayana by moonlight – part 3| Dec 21st 7.30 pm 2020 #mondayfixgoa

Imran Ali Khan with Arshia Sattar – in conversation

Reading the Ramayana by moonlight- Part |||Imran Ali Khan with Arshia Sattar. They are discussing about the process of translating a text that has come to mean different things at different times, unpack the existential crisis that follows the characters in decisions between right and wrong.

Arshia Sattar is a translator, author and director. Sattar obtained her PhD in South Asian Languages and Civilizations from the University of Chicago in 1990. Arshia’s translations of the Kathasaritsagara was published by Penguin in 1996. Arshia’s engagement with the Ramayana goes back three decades when, after her PhD, she translated Valmiki’s Ramayana. Arshia’s work with the Ramayana has resulted in countless essays, articles, three children’s books and the wonderful collection of essays entitled, Lost Loves: Exploring Rama’s Anguish (published by Penguin). Arshia writes regularly for the Open Magazine and Mint Lounge. Arshia teaches classical Indian Literatures in India and abroad, and is currently a freelance writer and researcher.

Imran Ali Khan is a writer and researcher and sometimes he makes images too. He uses stories as maps to find his way. Imran’s last project, entitled Kiski Kahani: The Ramayana Project, looked at ways in which the Ramayana, in its many diverse retellings and forms, could be archived and documented. Imran then went on to work closely with Ramayana performances in India, specifically at the foothills of the Himalayas in the Kullu Valley. In 2018 Imran was a fellow at the Akademie Schloss Solitude, Germany where he worked on his research and created a large scale installation entitled, In the Valley of Memory. Imran continues to finds his way in the world through the many tellings of the Ramayana.

Zoom Meeting link
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/86720728432

YouTube- Thuslive Streaming
https://youtube.com/channel/UC4pPZMRq-aXepEOYkaVTsJg

Host @Hisarwalla Design @palebluedotgoa
solidarity @ecoposro + @ediblearchives

Please contribute to keep this non partisan independent platform sharp – to listen, analyse and be polite. And to encourage critical thinking.

https://www.instamojo.com/@thus_critique/

Reading the Ramayana by Moonlight (Part ||) | Arshia Sattar with Imran Ali Khan

#mondayfixgoa Nov 30th 7.30 pm

A few months back in September, we hosted a fantastic discussion between Arshia Sattar and Imran Ali Khan on reading the Ramayana by Moonlight. One of the promises we were able to extract – based on popular demand for an encore – was to come back with a second edition (and there will also be a third).

Please join Arshia and Imran on 30th November, Monday (with a serendipitious full moon) for the second session in our series on reading the Ramayana by Moonlight. They will read some of their favourite passages from Arshia’s translation of the Valmiki Ramayana, published in 1995. Through the readings, Imran and Arshia will talk further about the story of Rama as he journeys across landscapes, over rivers and into the deepest forests – spaces real and imagined, sensual and tactile.

Zoom link – https://us02web.zoom.us/j/85739705270 Passcode Ramayana

Youtube – thuslive streaming

They will take us through the many Indian arts of story telling that are the real medium through which Ramayana has been kept alive, and is also therefore a far more plural and diverse text, than we understand. For over thirty years, Arshia has worked closely with the Ramayana, charmed by its metaphors and made uncomfortable by its brutalities. Join us as we attempt to understand a story that has captured the imagination of the subcontinent for over 2000 years.

Solidarity partners of thus.
https://ediblearchives.com https://ecoposro.com

Contributions
https://www.instamojo.com/@thus_critique/

Reading the Ramayana by moonlight | A conversation

Imran Ali Khan with Arshia Sattar

Join us on Mondayfix when Imran Ali Khan talks to Arshia Sattar about the Ramayana, her translation of the Valmiki text first published in the 1990s and the complexities of reading this story in the 21st century. Arshia will speak about the process of translating a text that has come to mean different things at different times, unpack the existential crisis that follows the characters in decisions between right and wrong.

Arshia Sattar is a translator, author and director. Sattar obtained her PhD in South Asian Languages and Civilizations from the University of Chicago in 1990. Arshia’s translations of the Kathasaritsagara was published by Penguin in 1996. Arshia’s engagement with the Ramayana goes back three decades when, after her PhD, she translated Valmiki’s Ramayana. Arshia’s work with the Ramayana has resulted in countless essays, articles, three children’s books and the wonderful collection of essays entitled, Lost Loves: Exploring Rama’s Anguish (published by Penguin). Arshia writes regularly for the Open Magazine and Mint Lounge. Arshia teaches classical Indian Literatures in India and abroad, and is currently a freelance writer and researcher.

Imran Ali Khan is a writer and researcher and sometimes he makes images too. He uses stories as maps to find his way. Imran’s last project, entitled Kiski Kahani: The Ramayana Project, looked at ways in which the Ramayana, in its many diverse retellings and forms, could be archived and documented. Imran then went on to work closely with Ramayana performances in India, specifically at the foothills of the Himalayas in the Kullu Valley. In 2018 Imran was a fellow at the Akademie Schloss Solitude, Germany where he worked on his research and created a large scale installation entitled, In the Valley of Memory. Imran continues to finds his way in the world through the many tellings of the Ramayana.

Zoom Meeting link
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/85638561326

Meeting ID: 856 3856 1326

Host @Hisarwalla Design @palebluedotgoa
solidarity @ecoposro + @ediblearchives

Please contribute to keep this non partisan independent platform sharp – to listen, analyse and be polite. And to encourage critical thinking.

https://www.instamojo.com/@thus_critique/